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Old World

France

France

Historically known for their exceptional wines, France has traditionally provided the benchmarks by which all other wines are judged globally. With many French grapes being taken from their respective homes and finding international stardom thousands of miles away in other countries, French winemakers have travelled widely and – returning to shake the dust from previously arcane wine making activities – have introduced a new vision to the wines of France. Our selection of French wines come from the highly regarded regions of Burgundy, Beaujolais, Bordeaux, Loire and Alsace.

Italy

Italy

Across rural landscapes, many of which have barely changed over thousands of years, the triumvirate of bread, olives and wine still dominate the culture that underpins Italian cuisine. A country that stretches from the Alpine north to the Isle of Sicily lying further south than the northern coastline of Africa, Italy boasts over 2000 indigenous grape varieties. With so many scores of Italian wines offering such excitement and energy, it’s safe to say that they’re almost unrivalled in any other wine making country in the world.

Spain and Portugal

Spain and Portugal

Spain has more land under vine than any other European country. The landscape is wildly diverse, with forbidding mountain ranges, arid, desert-like plains, forested hillsides and pastured fields. Offering many stark contrasts, and following a somewhat overdue renaissance, Spain has 67 classified wine making regions peppered by dynamic producers eager to present their achievements to a global audience.

Germany, Austria and England

Germany, Austria and England

It is often suggested that Germany, Austria, and indeed England, may share natural similarities. They clearly all make wines so very different from the sun-soaked grapevines of a Mediterranean driven climate, or the exportation of Latin grape varieties to the New World. One can forget the world of tannins, high alcohol or robust structure. If anything, they all share a particular style which, when carefully attended, can offer fragility and strength, refreshing acidity, and in their highest expression, white wines of sublime concentration and delicacy.

Champagne and Sparkling

Champagne and Sparkling

The one thing that all Champagnes and Sparkling wines have in common is that they do indeed sparkle. This is caused by a show of bubbles in your glass, and their origination is the result of carbon dioxide being dissolved in a still wine. No great mystery then, but the wines are still surrounded by a mantle of romance, poetry and magic. Our flight of Champagnes have acquired their bubbles from a crucial second alcoholic fermentation to produce the finest sparkling wines.

Fortified and Spirits

Fortified and Spirits

No single wine is as exalted and as misunderstood as Sherry. From its former pre-eminence alongside wines of Burgundy and Bordeaux, it has been much maligned over the past few decades, but thanks to the availability of increasingly eclectic cuisine and the new range of craft cocktails, Sherry once more is being given the attention it deserves. It is produced in what is known as the ‘Sherry triangle’ in Andalusia, and no other wine region can boast of making both the driest and the sweetest wines in the world.

Dessert Wines

Dessert Wines

Dessert or sweet wines have become inexplicably more marginal, often in direct contrast to our increasing fondness for still and sparkling styles of wine. Sweet wines often represent the most complex and luscious flavours and can enhance or even replace the pudding course. In a nutshell perfectly good grapes are attacked by a peculiar looking fungus called botrytis - or Noble Rot - which removes water and concentrate sugars in the grape. These grapes, when fermented, produce the straw-yellow wines which are capable of ageing for decades.